Old Norse greetings

Greeting, in Old Norse, is declined for the genre to which is referred. 

Heill, the basic (and really one) greeting, is so declined: 

- Heill to greet a man; 
- Heil to greet a woman; 
- Heilir to greet a group of men; 
- Heilar to greet a group of women; 
- Heil to greet a group including both sexes. 

Difference between single L and double L exists as well as in American English, for example in the word “mill” and “milk”. The diphthong “ei” is pronounced as the English “ai” and not as in German: it means that “heil” is read as the formal English “hail” and not the Nazi “heil”. 

Another question is to take leave. Norsemen, until about 1000 B.C., usually say “farewell” instead of “goodbye”. Old Norse word for “farewell” is fárvell, from wich descend the English farewell, the Swedish farväl and Danish farvel, today used for take real farewell and not to take leave. 

Declension of fárvell is the same of heill

- Fárvell to take leave from a man; 
- Fárvel to take leave from a woman; 
- Fárvelir to take leave from a group of men; 
- Fárvelar to take leave from a group of women; 
- Fárvel to take leave from a group including both genders.

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